BETWEEN RIVERSIDE AND CRAZY, BY STEPHEN ADLY GUIRGIS - ARTISTS REPERTORY THEATRE

  • The Oregonian 
  • Oregon Arts Watch - "Ben Newman nails the odd mix of reasonableness and reactive anger, good-hearted core and naked gamesmanship that make the character such a compelling counterweight to Pops’ self-righteous indignation."
  • Broadway World 

PERICLES WET, BY ELLEN MARGOLIS - PORTLAND SHAKESPEARE PROJECT

ASTORIA, PART ONE, BY CHRIS COLEMAN (Adapted from the novel by Peter Stark) - PORTLAND CENTER STAGE AT THE ARMORY

  • Oregon Arts Watch - "A fine turn...from Ben Newman as the fastidious clerk, Gabriele Franchere."

A DOLL'S HOUSE, BY HENRIK IBSEN - SHAKING THE TREE THEATRE

  • Broadway World - " Ben Newman, who continues his streak of heart-breaking performances as the kind and sickly Dr. Rank."
  • The Oregonian - "Ben Newman is devastating as Torvald's dearest friend and Nora's dearest admirer, Dr. Rank."

ORLANDO, BY SARAH RUHL - PROFILE THEATRE

  • Artslandia - "Ben Newman in particular embodies each of his many roles with captivating conviction, whether as a seductive Spanish dancer, or the handsome Marmaduke Bonthrop Shelmerdine, or the death buzz of a fly."
  • OregonLive
  • PQ Monthly
  • Portland Mercury - "Newman brings some much-needed tenderness to female Orlando's life as her husband."
                                                                           True West, by Sam Shepard - Profile Theatre

TRUE WEST, BY SAM SHEPARD - PROFILE THEATRE

  • Portland Mercury
  • The Oregonian - "Newman adeptly shifts gears — slipping instantaneously from a coarse charming ease to an electric volatility — and in doing so nicely personifies Lee’s unpredictability."
  • Willamette Week - "Newman moves like the pitbull Lee claims to once have owned."
  • Oregon ArtsWatch - "Ben Newman, all reflex and ooze."
                                                               Middletown, by Will Eno - Third Rail Repertory Theatre

MIDDLETOWN, BY WILL ENO - THIRD RAIL REPERTORY THEATRE

  • Broadway World - "Ben Newman does wonderful work as a mechanic who's fond of wondering (and wandering), and he has so much joy in his performance that you smile at him every time he walks on stage."
  • Oregon Arts Watch
  • The Oregonian
                                                                  Blood Knot, by Athol Fugard - Profile Theatre

BLOOD KNOT, BY ATHOL FUGARD - PROFILE THEATRE

  • Portland Monthly - "Both Newman and Mason, under Kevin Jones’s tight direction, give incredible performances that easily transform the intimate theater. And there are moments in the play, particularly when Morris first spits that ultimate of racial slurs at his brother, that fill the dense silence with incredibly dangerous electricity."
  • The Oregonian - "Newman and Mason are perhaps most effective when conveying the explosive emotions that arise when events suck Morris and Zach into a vortex of racial anxiety."

  • Oregon Arts Watch

BY BRIAN WATKINS - EDINBURGH INTERNATIONAL FRINGE FESTIVAL 2013

  • Broadway World Review - "Newman is an enchanting storyteller, effortlessly engaging the audience as he switches gears through cynicism, humour and sheer fear. He weaves in clever one-liners with astute observations and effectively makes us co-conspirators as he goes deeper and deeper into his confession."
  • Three Weeks (Radio Interview) - "It’s refreshing to see such minimalist, honestly emotional acting."
  • The List - "Ben Newman as Jake is the show’s real draw: he’s a thoroughly convincing study in uncertainty and guilt, giving a high-definition performance that brings his every stumbling thought to the fore. It’s a slight tale in some ways, but the sheer passion of Newman’s delivery makes its mysterious theme unforgettable."
  • The Guardian - "Minutely flinching, or flashing sudden grins, Newman's Jake was so credible we followed him, hardly noticing it, as his account of blue-collar America transformed into a prickly ghost story."

WIDE EYED PRODUCTIONS

  • NYTheatre.com - "Ben Newman plays McMurphy as an untutored, wild-eyed rabble-rouser; he's a reluctant revolutionary, however, which makes his journey in the play something profound."